PUBLICATIONS: Lallitha Jawahirilal

Art catalogues, books, journal articles and academic theses featuring works by Lallitha Jawahirilal 

Chambers, E. (2014) Black Artists in British Art: A History since the 1950s. London: Bloomsbury Publishing.
Google Books preview here

Cooney, L. (ed.) (2011) South Africa: Artists, Prints, Community: Twenty-Five Years at the Caversham Press. Boston: Boston University. Exhibition Catalogue, p. 70.
[download pdf here]

Brzyski, A. (ed.) (2007) Partisan Canons. Durham: Duke University Press.
Google Books preview here

Marschall, S. (2004) Serving Male Agendas: Two National Women’s Monuments in South Africa, Women’s Studies, 33:8, 1009-1033,
DOI: 10.1080/00497870490890816

Pissarra, M. (2004) The Luggage is Still Labelled, Third Text, 18:2, 183-191
DOI: 10.1080/0952882032000199696

Vale, P., Ruiters, G. (2004) The Right Way Up? South Africa Ten Years On. International Politics, 41, 375–393 (2004).
https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.ip.8800083

Khan, S. (2004) Lallitha Jawahirilal. In: Khan, S. (ed.) The ID of South African artists. Amsterdam : Stichting Art & Theatre, 134-137.
[download pdf here]

Deliry-Antheaume, E. (2003) Readings from the walls: art and education. Perspectives in Education, 21:2, 1 – 14.
https://hdl.handle.net/10520/EJC87202

Marschall, S. (2001) The Poetics of Politics. Imagi[ni]ng the New South African Nation. Safundi, 2:2, 1-20, doi: 10.1080/17533170100102201

Deliry-Antheaume, E. (2000) Murs des écoles, école des murs en Afrique du Sud. Les institutions éducatives vues du dehors. In: Lange, M.F. (ed.) Des écoles pour le Sud. Aube: IRD Editions, 167-175.
[download pdf here]

Abstract (english)
School walls, the school of walls in South Africa : how education institutions are seen from the outside
School walls reflect local architectural story in educational establishments. Graffiti and mural art witness to the recent transformations in South African society and often draw attention to the right to education and to the environ- ment in which education is offered. By review- ing a number of creative experiments (with photos), we see that the walls are themselves transformed into « schools » and provide an alternative form of teaching which can contri- bute to the healing as well as the reconstruc- tion of a society undermined by decades of segregation.

Bedford, E. et al. (eds.) (1997) Contemporary South African Art 1985 – 1995 from the South African National Gallery Permanent Collection. Cape Town: South African National Gallery.

Delfina Studio Trust (1990) Annual Group Show at Delfina Studios. London: Delfina.

Sebestyen, A (1990) Lallitha Jawahirilal, City Limits, 6-13 December 1990, 24

Oliphant, A. W. (1989) The art of Lallitha Jawahirilal. Staffrider8:2 (1989), 48-53
[download pdf here]

Academic theses mentioning works by Lallitha Jawahirilal 

Lilla, Q. (2018) Setting Art Apart: Inside and Outside the South African National Gallery (1895-2016). PhD Thesis, Stellenbosch University, https://scholar.sun.ac.za/handle/10019.1/103265.
[download pdf here]

Adendorff, D. A. (2017) The Princess in the Veld: Curating Liminality in Contemporary South African Female Art Production. PhD Thesis, University of Pretoria.
http://hdl.handle.net/2263/63007

Pillay, T. (2014) The artistic practices of contemporary South African Indian women artists : how race, class and gender affect the making of visual art. MA Thesis, Unisa, http://uir.unisa.ac.za/handle/10500/18736
[download pdf here]

Moodley, N. (2012) Culture, politics and identity in the visual art of Indian South African graduates from the University of Durban-Westville in KwaZulu-Natal, 1962-1999. PhD Thesis, UKZN, https://researchspace.ukzn.ac.za/handle/10413/10724
[download pdf here]

Burger, M. A. C. (2005) Transformation within personal and public realms through contemporary artmaking processes. MA Thesis, University of Johannesburg
http://hdl.handle.net/10210/5247
[dowlnload pdf here]

Malatjie, L. P. (2004) Framing the artwork of Tracey Rose and Berni Searle through black feminism. MA Thesis University of the Witwatersrand
http://hdl.handle.net/10539/11750
[download pdf here]

White, E. 2004. There’s no place (like home) : a graphic interpretation of personal notions of home and displacement. MA Thesis, Unisa, University of Cape Town
http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10891
[download pdf here]

Khan, S. (2006) A critical analysis of the iconography of six HIV/AIDS murals from Johannesburg and Durban, in terms of race, class and gender. MA Thesis University of the Witwatersrand, http://wiredspace.wits.ac.za/handle/10539/4694
[download pdf here]

Khan, S. (2002) A critical analysis of the depiction of women in murals in Kwazulu-Natal. Thesis in partial fulfilment of MA (Fine Arts), University of Durban-Westville. Supervisor: Sabine Marschall). [download pdf here]

WORKS: Reshma Chhiba – Writing

Texts by Reshma Chhiba

Chhiba, R. (2017) The two talking yonis : the use of Hindu iconography in conversations of race, identity, politics and womanhood within contemporary South African art. Nidan : International Journal for Indian Studies, Volume 2 Number 2, pp. 44 – 60
This article looks at the use of Hindu iconography within South African visual art practice and its relation to race, identity, politics and womanhood in the work of Reshma Chhiba. It draws primarily on work from the 2013 exhibition entitled The Two Talking Yonis: Reshma Chhiba in conversation with Nontobeko Ntombela, and discusses Chhiba’s use of the image of the goddess Kali, the concept of yoni, the use of Bharatanatyam and understandings of feminine energy in relation to womanhood. It also threads a narrative of Chhiba’s ancestry through a poetic description of her grandmother’s journey from India to South Africa, and the embodiment of Kali as a form of defiance not only in her work, but also in her grandmother.
https://journals.co.za/content/journal/10520/EJC-c195dbc56

Continue reading “WORKS: Reshma Chhiba – Writing”

Senzeni Marasela

Art on our Mind Creative Dialogue with Senzeni Marasela

Senzeni Marasela is a cross-disciplinary artist who explores photography, video, prints, and mixed-medium installations involving textiles and embroidery. Her work deals with history, memory, and personal narrative, emphasizing historical gaps and overlooked figures. Her work includes embroidery, print and video as well as performance and has been widely exhibited in South Africa, Europe and the US. Her work features in prominent local and international collections, including MoMA, New York. She was recently part of the Johannesburg Pavillion at the last Venice Biennale.

Born in Thokoza, South Africa, Marasela studied at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, where she obtained a BA Fine Arts in 1998. In 2003 she started a project titled Theodorah comes to Johannesburg, a durational performance based on her mother Theodorah’s stories about travels from the rural area of Mvenyane to Johannesburg, a journey of 11 hours. Like many young black women in the city, her mother was traumatised by events that took place in apartheid South Africa during the 1960s. Many black women returned to live in the countryside and many more were forced to undertake journeys into strangeness. Marasela wore a yellow dress that her mother gave her, taking on Theodorah as an alter ego. The artist has always felt that Theodorah’s story was representative of that of many black women in South Africa. The emblematic yellow dress has been translated into drawings, prints and thread works, always with the figure’s back to the audience. The story of Theodorah never left Marasela’s work and has at times been combined with that of Sarah Baartman (who was ‘exhibited’ around nineteenth- century Europe as the ‘Hottentot Venus’) and of the artist herself.

CREATIVE DIALOGUE

Dr Sharlene Khan and Senzeni Marasela at Rhodes Fine Art Department on 26 April 2018.

VIDEO: Art on our Mind Creative Dialogue with Senzeni Marasela

AUDIO: Art on our Mind Creative Dialogue with Senzeni Marasela

 

Find Senzeni Marasela on Instagram:

 

My work as an Artist currently centres around narrating the life of my alter ego. Persona. Theodorah. A rural woman abandoned by her husband , comes to Johannesburg to look for him. I have taken on a journey to wear the Theodorah dress everyday . The journey has not been easily but made possible with the generosity of a number of people . Acting on my faith I have written to Art Lovers, Art Collectors and Artists and made requests that they donate a dress or dresses . The dream is to have 150 dresses. I will wear all of them , as I do with the number I have . I am under 50 dresses at the moment . I will end the project in 2019 , 1 October. #artistswork #theartofsenzenimarasela #artistmovement #searchforgebaneinmines #artistinspiration #SenzeniMarasela #davidzwirner #davidzweinergallery #smithsonian #art154fair #ArtLondon #ArtReview #cantstopwontstop #akaa @jackshainman @mariangoodmangallery #africa #African_art_collectors_magazine #moma #tatemodern #cantstopwontstop #nytimes #artwork #artist #tiwanicontemporary #gallery #ArtLondon #artbasel #artbaselmiami #icp #metropolitanmuseumofart #saatchigallery #sunujournal

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ARCHIVAL RESOURCES: Senzeni Marasela

WORKS by Senzeni Marasela
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CATALOGUES, PRESS AND REVIEWS on Senzeni Marasela
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Artist CV
Afronova, Johannesburg, South Africa, [download pdf here]
Axis Gallery, New Jersey, USA, [download pdf here]
Gallery AOP, Johannesburg, South Africa