Turbine Art Fair 2020

Turbine Art Fair 2020 Special Project: Tactile Visions – Woven

Tactile Visions-Woven, curated by Prof Sharlene Khan, a new addition to the fair, presents a curated selection of tactile-based works in an expanded conversation with the notions of ‘materiality’ and ‘tactility’, as contemporary artists engage these in performance, installation, photography, painting, dance, printmaking and sculpture, responding to the precarious conditions of the world in which they find themselves as individuals and as members of society. The exhibition also aims to show, through the porosity of the categories of ‘fine arts’/ ‘crafts’/ ‘women’s art’/ ‘popular culture’ that these are not – and simply never were – tenable in the fluidity that are our African lives.
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Tactile Visions-Woven: artist interviews

Bev Butkow

Buhlebezwe Siwani

Londiwe Mtshali

Philiswa Lila

Reshma Chhiba

Mary Sibande

Nono Motlhoki

Zodwa Skeyi-Tutani

Dean Hutton

Lebogang Mogul Mabusela

Willemien de Villiers

Thania Petersen

Lindelwa Masuku

Curator Sharlene Khan

Tactile Visions/ Woven (Turbine Art Fair 2020)

Curated by Sharlene Khan, Tactile Visions-Woven is an expanded conversation on our relationalities with materials; processes by which we engage them; histories implicated by them, as well as how we envision ourselves and our world through sartorial codes. South Africa has an immensely rich history of tactile arts – from beadwork to embroidery, leather work, quilts and blanket making to doilies and the weaving of baskets with telephone wires to the ability to decorate with ordinary steel pins. The exhibition is interested in how contemporary artists are using the language of these everyday tactilities to question a range of social issues that affect them as individuals and a world which seems perched on a precarious edge. At the same time, this act of using the ordinary is redefining the very terrain of what we associate as ‘fine art’ versus ‘craft’ and have categorised into ‘women’s art’, ‘popular culture’ and ‘fashion’, showing that these positions never had any place in our African lives or histories. And so it is fascinating how the field of contemporary visual arts has become reconfigured at this intersection of the everyday and, sometimes, even the unspectacular. The exhibition presents works of established and emerging artists in dialogue with each other as they speak to similar narratives through a range of different subject positions, showing that our battles may seem different, but, indeed, our struggles are interconnected and, thus, so should our visions for a better world.  

About the curator:
Sharlene Khan is a South African visual artist who works in multi-media installations and performances which focus on the socio-political realities of a post-apartheid society and the intersectionality of race-gender-class. She uses masquerading as a postcolonial strategy to interrogate her South African heritage, as well as the constructedness of identity via rote education, art discourses, historical narratives and popular culture.


She has exhibited in the UK, Italy, France, Germany, South Africa, India, South Korea, Greece and has participated in various international conferences. Her writings on contemporary visual arts appears in journals, books, art catalogues and magazines including Art South Africa, Artthrob, Springerin, Manifesta, Contemporary-And, The Conversation Africa, Imbizo: International Journal of African Literary and African Studies. She has been a recipient of the Abe Bailey Travel Bursary (1998), the Rockefeller Bellagio Arts residency (2009) the Canon Collins/Commonwealth Scholarship (2011), the National Research Foundation Thutuka Grant for her 3 year project Art on our Mind (2017-2019), the Andrew Mellon Decolonial Turn Funds for her Decolonial AestheSis Creative Lab (2017-2018), the African Humanities Post-doctoral Fellowship (2017) and was runner-up winner in the Videokunst Preis Bremen video art award (2015).


She has been nominated twice for the South African Women in the Arts award and has received funding from the National Arts Council multiple times. She has published three books on her work: ‘What I look like, What I feel like’ (2009), ‘I Make Art’ (2017), ‘When the moon waxes red. . . ‘ (2018). She is co-convenor of the African Feminisms (Afems) conference and the bi-weekly Black Feminist Killjoys Reading Group. She holds a PhD (Arts) from Goldsmiths, University of London and is currently Associate Professor at the Department of Fine Art at the Wits University, Johannesburg, South Africa.  

Curatorial statement Sharlene Khan

RMB Turbine Art Fair Talk: Threaded Vision
Craig Jacobs, Ethical Fashion Designer in discussion with Sharlene Khan, Curator of Woven.

WORKS: Lallitha Jawahirilal – Exhibitions

Exhibitions by/with Lallitha Jawahirilal

Selected Solo Exhibitions

2008 The African Art Centre, Durban
2002 Greatmore Studios, Cape Town
2001 Puddled Sand and Red Ashes, Monash University Faculty Gallery, Australia 
1999 Curwen Gallery, London
1996 New Academy Gallery, London
1994 New Academy Gallery, London
1991 Galerie Trapez, Berlin
1990 Gallery 21, Johannesburg
1990 198 Gallery, London
1985 Africa Centre, Stockholm 

Selected Group Exhibitions 

2007 ‘Confluence’, Kalakriti Art Gallery, Hyderabad
2007 16th Anniversary Art Salon, Bangalore
2006 ‘Art Camp’, Renaissance Art Centre, Mumbai
2005 River Arts & Music Festival, Ladysmith, South Africa
2004 ‘Decade Of Democracy’, South African National Gallery, Cape Town 
2003 ‘Journeys’, Ernest G. Welsh School of Art and Design, Atlanta
2001 ‘Jabulisa, The Art of KwaZulu Natal’, Durban Art Gallery, South Africa
2000 African Art Centre, Durban, South Africa
1999 Nico Malan Theatre, Cape Town
1998 ‘Kunst aus Südafrika’, Gallerie Seippel, Stuttgart, Germany 
1998 Newcastle Museum, United Kingdom
1997 Trienalle, Lalit Kala Academy, New Delhi
1996 ‘Conjures’, First Gallery, Johannesburg
1991 ‘Discerning Eye’,The Mall Galleries, London
1991 Barcelona International Biennale, Spain
1990 Contemporary Art Society, Art Market, Smith Gallery, London 
1990 ‘Broadgate’, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London 
1989 ‘Art London/89’, London
1987-8 Third International Bienniale Print Exhibition, Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taiwan 
1985 Mirror Reflecting Darkly: Black Women’s Art, Brixton Art Collective, London.

 

Mirror Reflecting Darkly: Black Women’s Art.
18 June – 6 July, Brixton Art Gallery, London.
Unpag. (10 pp.) exhibiyion catalogue. Group exhibition of 16 Black women artists collective. Artists included: Brenda Patricia Agard, Zarina Bhimji, Jennifer Comrie, Novette Cummings, Valentina Emenyeoni, Carole Enahoro, Elisabeth Jackson, Lallitha Jawahirilal, Rita Keegan, Christine Luboga, Sue Macfarlane, Olusola Oyeleye, Betty Vaughan Richards, Enoyte Wanagho, and Paula Williams. 8vo, orange covers.
Source: Brixton 50. Brixton Art Gallery Archive 1983-86

WORKS: Shelley Barry – Film

Exhibitions and Screenings (selection)

2019

Here (VR dance film installation, South Africa, 10mins) 
Presented at: Immersive Africa Exhibition – A Collection of 360° Narratives
Works by work by Nyasha Kadandara, Shelley Barry and Nirma Madhoo.
Isivivana Center in Khayelitsha, Cape Town.
10-13 December 2019
Curated by Electric South

Presented at: In Frame – A 360 Film Exhibition
23 November 2019-11 January 2020
TMRW Gallery, Rosebank

Second Creativate Digital Arts Festival at the National Arts Festival
Makhanda, 27 June to 7 July 2019
National Arts Festival 2019 #1, #2, #3

2010

An Evening With Shelley Barry

28 April 2010, New York University, 19 University Place, 1st Fl theater. Room 102.
Part of the disTHIS! Film Series, a project of the Disabilities Network of NYC in association with the New York University Council for the Study of Disability, a monthly showcase of festival quality independent and international short, documentary and feature films with disability themes audiences are unlikely to see elsewhere.
Film director Shelley Barry @ NYU, Sean Jacobs, Africasacrountry

2007

Umbilical Cord (rehearsal documentation)
Presented at: eVokability: The Walking Project
14, 15, 16 June 2007
Dance Theatre Workshop Studio
219 West 19th Street, NYC 10011

22 & 23 June 2007
Spirit Wind Studio
213 New St., Philadelphia, PA 19106

Selected Filmography

2019

Here (VR dance film installation, South Africa, 10mins) 
Premiere at the Together! 2019 Disability Film Festival, 6-8 December 2019
The Old Town Hall Stratford Broadway London E15 4BQ, IMDB

2018

Re:incarnation (video poetry) 
A woman longs for her lover she has spent lifetimes with. 

Presented at Latitudes Art Fair 2020

Out of Reach (video poetry) 
The city is out of reach for people with disabilities. 

Ink/Visible 
A writer contemplates how writing counters invisibility. 

2015

Keep in Touch

This fast paced, edgy music documentary celebrates the rise of Dope St Junde, a young, gender queer hip- hop star and all the challenges she faces in their quest for success.

Review:
Staff writer (2015) Feminist Filmmaker Meets Boss Bitch Rapper. thejournalist 18 June 2015. Available online here.

2014

I’m Not Done Yet
A tribute to artist, activist and writer, Charlene Maslamoney who succumbed to cancer in 2013. The 48-minute documentary celebrates Charlene’s work.

Reviews:
Arts Writer (2015) Filmmaker Barry’s new work inspires hope. Cape Times 21 May 2015. Available online here.
Cornelius, Jerome (2015) Film on activist’s cancer journey to touch patients’ lives. Times Live (7 August 2015). Available online here.
Lewis, Desiree (2015) Gender, feminism and food studies. African Security Review, 24(4): 414-429. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10246029.2015.1090115
Available online here.

Diaries of a Dissident Poet (shortened documentary feature) 
Tracing the story of Dr James Matthews who used poetry to fight against the struggle and save his own life. 
Selected and sold out: Encounters Documentary Film Festival.

2013

Mr Shakes the Passion to Live (shortened documentary feature) 
A story of disco, cancer, tik. And Jesus. 
Selected and sold out: Encounters Documentary Film Festival 

Trailer: Mr Shakes – the passion to live

2011

Place of Grace (in collaboration with Gerard Samuel) 
The dance of love and betrayal. 
Funded by GIPCA, UCT, screened at UCT School of Dance on 9 April 2011

2007

Where We Planted Trees 
The story of nostalgia for a house taken away during the group areas act in Port Elizabeth. 
Best Documentary: Diamond Screen film festival, Philadelphia 

New York/New Brighton (short fiction)
Two young girls across the oceans (Port Elizabeth and New York) dream of meeting Mandela and Yemaya. 

2006

Cry Like the Loons (experimental documentary)
A car accident transforms a holiday experience.

Str/oll (experimental documentary)
A woman in a wheelchair explores the streets of Manhattan. 

Umbilical Cord 
A revisioning of Frida Kahlo’s painting “What the water gave me” 

2005

Retrato/Portrait (short fiction) 
Portraits from the life of a transwoman reflecting on her transition and her fractured relationship with her mother. 

Presented at Latitudes Art Fair 2020
Watch preview on Vimeo:

Inclinations (short fiction) 
Co-directed with Jen Simmons 
A writer faces blocks in writing and in love. 
Extensive screenings worldwide. 
Purchased by MTV in 2007 Selected as top 10 click list on MTV’s online film site. 

Where are my Heels? (experimental documentary) 
A two year old girl in Puerto Rico takes over a party. 

Pants? Skirt? Lipstick? 
Queer couples and their friends plot a night of fooling immigration for a green card, during the Presidency of George Bush. 
Selected for screening at The San Francisco Gay and Lesbian Film Festival 

2004

Whole: A Trinity of Being (experimental documentary) 
Three experimental shorts which deal with sexuality, visibility, and voice from the perspective of a wheelchair user who turns the camera on herself to celebrate love and survival. Including Pin Pricks, Voice/Over and Entry (Source: African Film Festival New York)

Best Film: Superfest: California
Best Narrative Short: Philadelphia Festival of Independents
Best Experimental Film: Breaking Barriers Festival: Moscow
Best Experimental Film: Projections 2: Canada
Spirit of Independence Award: Brooklyn (New York) International Disability Film Festival 
Jurors Citation Award: Black Maria Film Festival, New Jersey
Outstanding Graduate Student Award, Pennsylvania Association of Graduate Schools 
Audre Lorde scholarship award for media production 
Television Acquisition: WYBE, DUTV (community tv stations USA) SABC, SA International festival screenings 

Presented at Latitudes Art Fair 2020
Watch preview on Vimeo

African Film Festival New York
International Movie Database

WORKS: Reshma Chhiba – Writing

Texts by Reshma Chhiba

Chhiba, R. (2017) The two talking yonis : the use of Hindu iconography in conversations of race, identity, politics and womanhood within contemporary South African art. Nidan : International Journal for Indian Studies, Volume 2 Number 2, pp. 44 – 60
This article looks at the use of Hindu iconography within South African visual art practice and its relation to race, identity, politics and womanhood in the work of Reshma Chhiba. It draws primarily on work from the 2013 exhibition entitled The Two Talking Yonis: Reshma Chhiba in conversation with Nontobeko Ntombela, and discusses Chhiba’s use of the image of the goddess Kali, the concept of yoni, the use of Bharatanatyam and understandings of feminine energy in relation to womanhood. It also threads a narrative of Chhiba’s ancestry through a poetic description of her grandmother’s journey from India to South Africa, and the embodiment of Kali as a form of defiance not only in her work, but also in her grandmother.
https://journals.co.za/content/journal/10520/EJC-c195dbc56

Continue reading “WORKS: Reshma Chhiba – Writing”

RE-MEMBERING: MEMORY, INTIMACY, ARCHIVE

Collaborative exhibition featuring works by Sharlene Khan, Jordache A. Ellapen and Reshma Chhiba

22-25 June 2018, Michaelis Galleries, University of Cape Town
31-37 Orange Street, Gardens, Cape Town
Opening Hours: Tuesday – Friday, 11- 4pm
Contact Nkule Mabaso on 021 650 7170 for more information

The exhibition Re-membering: Memory, Intimacy, Archive features works by South African artists Reshma Chhiba, Sharlene Khan and Jordache A. Ellapen from their projects titled Kali (2008) and The Two Talking Yonis (2013); When the Moon Waxes Red (2016); and Queering the Archive: Brown Bodies in Ecstasy (2016) respectively. In these projects, through the lens of the ‘Indian’ experience, these artists explore and unsettle notions of memory, race, class, gender, and sexuality in post-apartheid South Africa and comment on the nuances and complexities of everyday life in South Africa. In Chhiba’s works, the Indian goddess Kāli is a central starting point where particular reference is made to her iconography and mythology. For her series, Khan works with different visual media like video-art, digital photography, and needle-lace to produce “visual textured narratives”, which narrate the difficult circumstances experienced by migratory women. Ellapen engages black and white archival studio photographs and digital photographs to produce digital “visual assemblages” that disrupts the heteronormative logics of family, community, and nation. Their works jointly speak to everyday experiences and performativities of identities shaped through the tensions of cultural migrations, familial love, loss and mythologies that are too often simplistically and sentimentally rendered. These entanglements add richness to a segment of South African history that is still lacking.

Re-membering Lunchtime Lecture, UCT 25 July 2018

Lunchtime lecture by Sharlene Khan and Reshma Chhiba on their exhibition with Jordache Ellapen “Re-membering: Memory, Intimacy, Archive” held at the University of Cape Town, 25 July 2018